ILE – Innovation Lab by ECCO
[Lab tour + interview]
Quant-U is a project by ECCO shoes, from its own Innovation lab (ILE), stuffed with technology and "crazy scientists" (no white lab coats in sight). Jokes aside, it is a group of industrial designers, engineers, strategists, and digital developers creating and testing some of the most advanced footwear and retail technologies focused on customization processes.

Located adjacent to the glass doors of BYBORRE, their space is a center point for innovative ideas for footwear design and production, that our team had a privilege to be invited to.

We managed to get a fuller understanding of the Quant-U technology, how math and AI can help you run better and why your next VR controller might be on your feet.

Here is a recap of our visit and an insight into the team's thought process.
Denis Khrebtov [ILE, Head of Digital]:

Quant-U is a technology for us, short for Quantified You.

The idea is that with the integration of data from wearable sensors and foot scanners, we can create a virtual twin of a person.

This allows us to use this information to customize a shoe matching the wearer's profile of fit and dynamics and at the same time, creating a new application of wearable electronics and biomechanical augmentation.

Quant-U, until now, has been an experimental project for ECCO shoes, with the largest deployment, in terms of in-store events, in Japan.

[TH: What year was it roughly?]

It was between 2018 and 2019 up to the beginning of the COVID crisis.
ECCO's Tokyo office engaged with the events and created a refined marketing campaign for it. In Japan, the ECCO brand is curated particularly well due to the great attention of consumers for quality. Footwear sales staff are often trained as professional "shoe-fitters", suggesting not only style tips but helping mainly to choose the perfect fit.

Quant-U events were a measurable success in Japan, well received by the public, proving that additional customization services in footwear are appetible to the public, help raise the brand perception and loyalty and could generate new revenue streams.

[Can you please describe the customization process in detail?]

First step, we generate a 3D scan of both feet. This is necessary to understand the anatomical part of the wearer, such as foot size, girth, instep, arch height, etc. This can be executed in-store with a foot scanner or our mobile 3D scan app by the staff.
Secondly, we capture the customer's step dynamics (gait). We provide sensors embedded sneakers, a technology completely internally developed, able to capture a broad range of biomechanical information. Dynamic measurements are very simple to complete, once the test shoes are worn, the customer walks for 30 seconds on a traditional treadmill, at a speed of 5 kilometers per hour.

From these short sessions, the sensors capture a wide amount of data that is interpreted by a cloud-based Ai system; the results depict a complete picture of the wearer's gait parameters: stability, foot strike patterns, energy return, step symmetry, and loads, cushioning.

Data is so rich that it could be used, with the necessary certifications, for other purposes with information such as general fitness, predicted age, fall risk, gait anomalies, etc.

The main advantage of using "in-shoe" sensors is that now we are not limited to a treadmill, but they can be worn for a longer period of time while capturing data or with short in-store walks.

The third stage is to collect personal wearing preferences. Fit is a very subjective concept, for example, a foot scanner provides accurate foot dimensions, in millimeters.

This dimension is interpreted by our brand's size chart in conventional shoe size, say 43. The final ideal wearing size can differ from the exact foot measure, in sensible ways.
Secondly, we capture the customer's step dynamics (gait). We provide sensors embedded sneakers, a technology completely internally developed, able to capture a broad range of biomechanical information. Dynamic measurements are very simple to complete, once the test shoes are worn, the customer walks for 30 seconds on a traditional treadmill, at a speed of 5 kilometers per hour.

From these short sessions, the sensors capture a wide amount of data that is interpreted by a cloud-based Ai system; the results depict a complete picture of the wearer's gait parameters: stability, foot strike patterns, energy return, step symmetry, and loads, cushioning.

Data is so rich that it could be used, with the necessary certifications, for other purposes with information such as general fitness, predicted age, fall risk, gait anomalies, etc.
The main advantage of using "in-shoe" sensors is that now we are not limited to a treadmill, but they can be worn for a longer period of time while capturing data or with short in-store walks.

The third stage is to collect personal wearing preferences. Fit is a very subjective concept, for example, a foot scanner provides accurate foot dimensions, in millimeters.

This dimension is interpreted by our brand's size chart in conventional shoe size, say 43. The final ideal wearing size can differ from the exact foot measure, in sensible ways.
This is subjective, not exactly a technology error. It's just that each person likes to wear shoes differently or has preferences for more responsive or cushioning behavior. In conclusion, after these three steps, a virtual representation of the customer is generated, as well as 3D geometry for the customized component that will be 3D printed with silicone.

And please, always keep in mind that all the data is stored with strict GDRP local and global guidelines.

We call the finished product a midsole or footbed.

These components, once 3D printed, are inserted in specially developed Quant-U tech footwear (boots and sneakers), where the interior is mostly hollowed out and the mechanical performance and fit are fundamentally represented by the 3D printed component.

As digital currencies, once our customers are scanned and measured, we collect and represent data anonymously in our own Quant-U CRM. Algorithms and machine learning are involved at this stage because the sensor is in the heel, but we can tell what happens in other areas of the foot with fairly high confidence due to kinematic chains used by the virtual representation of the lower leg models.

We can see, here, for example, that this test person shows a high level of imbalance in load between the right and left foot and a skewed center of gravity…
This is subjective, not exactly a technology error. It's just that each person likes to wear shoes differently or has preferences for more responsive or cushioning behavior. In conclusion, after these three steps, a virtual representation of the customer is generated, as well as 3D geometry for the customized component that will be 3D printed with silicone.

And please, always keep in mind that all the data is stored with strict GDRP local and global guidelines.

We call the finished product a midsole or footbed.

These components, once 3D printed, are inserted in specially developed Quant-U tech footwear (boots and sneakers), where the interior is mostly hollowed out and the mechanical performance and fit are fundamentally represented by the 3D printed component.
As digital currencies, once our customers are scanned and measured, we collect and represent data anonymously in our own Quant-U CRM. Algorithms and machine learning are involved at this stage because the sensor is in the heel, but we can tell what happens in other areas of the foot with fairly high confidence due to kinematic chains used by the virtual representation of the lower leg models.

We can see, here, for example, that this test person shows a high level of imbalance in load between the right and left foot and a skewed center of gravity…
[Does it probably mean that the pelvis is slightly off-center to the left while walking for this person?]


In principle, we have a technology that allows us to detect this. We could, based on this data, intervene with particularly higher degrees of customization in a corrective manner, but this would enter the field of medical intervention, and ECCO is not and will never be directly involved in the orthopedic domain.
[So, what is the difference between traditional customized inserts and your technology? Besides the sensor measurement?]

The main difference is that Quant-U technology footwear allows us to intervene in feet (arch support included) and dynamics in a more extensive way. The reason for this, our footwear is designed to accommodate a customized component by being completely hollow inside. This allows us to create a tighter or looser fit while traditional inlays only reduce the internal volume of the shoe by adding material. Additionally, we tune our 3D printed parts for softness and elasticity based on body mass.
[Does it probably mean that the pelvis is slightly off-center to the left while walking for this person?]

In principle, we have a technology that allows us to detect this. We could, based on this data, intervene with particularly higher degrees of customization in a corrective manner, but this would enter the field of medical intervention, and ECCO is not and will never be directly involved in the orthopedic domain.
[So, what is the difference between traditional customized inserts and your technology? Besides the sensor measurement?]

The main difference is that Quant-U technology footwear allows us to intervene in feet (arch support included) and dynamics in a more extensive way. The reason for this, our footwear is designed to accommodate a customized component by being completely hollow inside. This allows us to create a tighter or looser fit while traditional inlays only reduce the internal volume of the shoe by adding material. Additionally, we tune our 3D printed parts for softness and elasticity based on body mass.
[Conventionally, if you take a model of a person's gait, you can probably follow the change in the situation if you do such scans there, once a year. Is it possible, for example, to correct problems with the lower limbs at an early stage? Again, not from a medical point of view, will such data inform the wearer about changes during the time in gait parameters?]

Absolutely, this was one of the initial ideas of the project. But please, consider this an experimental process so any medical aspect is not our scope, but yes, we could follow customers during the time in guided events or self-service scan locations where changes might be detected. Changes in weight distribution, fit, and other variables related to age or to performance degradation for athletes, for kids due to their growth, and so on.

Besides, another aspect of our lab is purely research. The topic of biomechanics and augmentation is particularly dear to us, for this, we are working with academic institutions to validate both our materials and data, including tests for performance concepts.
Interestingly, ECCO's main activity focus is always walking, but walking patterns are not as easy to interpret compared to running. Recording with sensors a running session, steps are very evident from a data perspective, energy return and cushioning values easier to analyze and compare, as well as the impact of the customized components on the gait. On the other hand, walking is much more subtle. We specialized in refined detection of traditional walking with a consumer-facing scenario in mind able to include the main traits seen in our customers.

[In theory, as we understand it, in running, the cadence observed is easier to detect, while, in the case of walking, there are more subtle changes between sessions?]

Yes, from our experience, walking is just not as easy to analyze compared to running, especially when it comes to the center of mass and other large inertial movements. We have been testing, quite extensively, the in-shoe climatic cooling and ventilation capability of our 3D printed open meshes, and the differences in efficiency are more evident in running than walking.
[By the way, it was not so clear at ISPO in 2019, to be honest.]

We didn't talk about it because we were and are still testing it at the university. Preliminary and experimental results are encouraging as a reduction of temperature in the shoe is directly related to one aspect of "measurable comfort".

[Tell us more about this sensor embedded in Exostrikes we see here…]

We are completing further research this year with different models of footwear in a roadmap to certify a few measurements from our sensors compared to the traditional, gold standard, biomechanics lab measuring setups.

Having a pair of sensors in the shoes without any external motion-tracking cameras or instrumented treadmills represents a paradigm shift in biomechanics, particularly if used for performance detection or other high-level analytics.

You can follow our journey on how we envision sensor-equipped footwear on our quant-u.pro website.
[We had an opportunity to speak to the Quant-U team at ISPO in 2019 at our booth. The main problem was, at that time, in terms of the use of this technology was simply a matter of giving it a consumer-friendly version. There was no chance to experience it outside your pilot projects or lab, do you have any updates?]

Commercialization is still a challenge. Because let's face it, many companies have tried and are trying to make smart shoes. Very few have midsole embedded sensors with load cells like ours, even fewer reach a high level of measurement and most of the wearable solutions are based on insoles or external pods where accuracy is much lower. Not considering the software side that, in existing solutions, is often crippling for the final user experience or data interpretation.

We are experimenting with a footwear platform, sensor-enabled, where the electronics are so well embedded within the shoe and at a reasonable cost, easy to integrate from a manufacturing point of view, that it will probably live in any pair of shoes; this would create a brand-new class of wearable electronics. We know that the USPs of such a platform, especially for health, security, and performance insights, could be a shift from traditional wearables like watches or mobile phones.
[So today it's more about experimental usage in professional settings, rather than direct to consumer?]

Yes, ECCO shoes is currently more focused on reinforcing our traditional business model, while letting our lab experiment with broader innovation horizons.

For now, our sensors, Ai for mechanical augmentation, and 3D printed developments are fully focused on footwear customization for fit and comfort.

[All our ECCOs are from Portugal…]

Well, it might be a coincidence as Portugal is the location of one of our factories and R&D centers. ECCO is a unique, vertically integrated footwear brand in the design, development, and manufacturing of our entire product range. Our factories are spread around the world due to the large volumes and global market presence.

[And in Denmark?]

Our headquarters are in Denmark. ECCO shoes were founded in Denmark. The fully owned ECCO Leather, one of the most advanced tanneries in the world, is based in the Netherlands. In terms of footwear development, our most advanced concepts are envisioned and developed in our R&I center in Denmark.
[So today it's more about experimental usage in professional settings, rather than direct to consumer?]

Yes, ECCO shoes is currently more focused on reinforcing our traditional business model, while letting our lab experiment with broader innovation horizons.

For now, our sensors, Ai for mechanical augmentation, and 3D printed developments are fully focused on footwear customization for fit and comfort.
[All our ECCOs are from Portugal…]

Well, it might be a coincidence as Portugal is the location of one of our factories and R&D centers. ECCO is a unique, vertically integrated footwear brand in the design, development, and manufacturing of our entire product range. Our factories are spread around the world due to the large volumes and global market presence.

[And in Denmark?]

Our headquarters are in Denmark. ECCO shoes were founded in Denmark. The fully owned ECCO Leather, one of the most advanced tanneries in the world, is based in the Netherlands. In terms of footwear development, our most advanced concepts are envisioned and developed in our R&I center in Denmark.
[Can you tell us more about your wearable sensors' development?]

Well, this is our fourth generation of sensors, they have better performance now, smaller footprint, and have more features than ever before. Including haptics, wireless in-shoe charging, and high gain BT antennas for long-range connection. We have smaller prototypes that can perform simple calculations, such as shoe or gait degradation warnings, they are amazing in terms of value/performance ratio.

Ease of use in this case, with mobile phone wireless tapping communication in place of Bluetooth, is a mandatory aspect.

[A question about running. There are now various new running power meters, Stryd for example. Are there any ideas for integration in terms of power gauge for running shoes?]

Our tech could be directly adapted for real-time power metering, cadence, strike patterns, cushioning and energy return, and so forth...

Our approach though is to use sensors' data to measure baseline figures and improvements related to the use of a particular customized midsole for one individual.

This will create an opportunity for the wearer to refine her/his footwear to its ideal performance.
[Can you tell us more about your wearable sensors' development?]

Well, this is our fourth generation of sensors, they have better performance now, smaller footprint, and have more features than ever before. Including haptics, wireless in-shoe charging, and high gain BT antennas for long-range connection. We have smaller prototypes that can perform simple calculations, such as shoe or gait degradation warnings, they are amazing in terms of value/performance ratio.

Ease of use in this case, with mobile phone wireless tapping communication in place of Bluetooth, is a mandatory aspect.
[A question about running. There are now various new running power meters, Stryd for example. Are there any ideas for integration in terms of power gauge for running shoes?]

Our tech could be directly adapted for real-time power metering, cadence, strike patterns, cushioning and energy return, and so forth...

Our approach though is to use sensors' data to measure baseline figures and improvements related to the use of a particular customized midsole for one individual.

This will create an opportunity for the wearer to refine her/his footwear to its ideal performance.
[Several brands have been experimenting with inserts of different densities inside the sole for a long time.]

Yes, and the main issue is that a thin, aftermarket inlay sole, often offered with arch support, is practically unable to alter the mechanical performance of the shoe (e.g., its cushioning, energy return, or stability).

In our case, our inserts represent 70% of the sole volume and they can alter those parameters in ways our own sensors can detect.
[Let's say you can have two of these insoles, and one pair of shoes – will it give essentially different results?]

Yes, the 3D printed silicone is an incredible material for footwear. Mechanically efficient, fully tunable, temperature insensitive, showing very little compression setting and degradation, biocompatible, and easy to print. One of the most interesting features is the tunability of the density and viscosity to offer cushion and step-in comfort parameters that are adaptable to one individual or to a particular activity. Our goal here is to offer a consistent feeling for one single customer along with different categories of products, where we could customize them all to offer the same wearing feeling for the ultimate comfort experience…
[We don't understand at all how people without such technologies wear shoes with thin leather soles, like a standard Chelsea boot. Style doesn't have to require sacrifice.]

In terms of style, we have adapted, in tests, this technology to pumps, flats, and formal shoes.

Challenging because the available space for the customized inlays is smaller than in a boot or a sneaker.

Nevertheless, we could achieve a broad level of customization due to the efficiency of the 3D printed silicone even at reduced heights.
[Do you have Exostrikes with Quant-U technology?]

Yes, we created a small Exostrike Quant-U capsule collection for ISPO.

[They're great even without that, by the way. A member of our team has been wearing them for the 3rd winter, the Dyneema version, and the sole has worn off for maybe a couple of microns at most. We suppose if you insert your insole, then this is generally some kind of cosmic feeling.]

You might be surprised by how we made a perfect boot, an individually perfect boot, with all the dynamic advantages of the 3D printed silicone and a tuned fit.
[A slightly different question, but, nonetheless, if we compare similar technologies, like 4D from Adidas, Futurecraft. In terms of production processes, is it possible to make a one-piece midsole and sole, with your technology, in one unit? That is, to produce one-piece construction shoes.]

Our 3D printed silicone has advantages and disadvantages, being fundamentally different than any other DLP 3D printing process. We have limitations in geometry freedom but other advantages we can't discuss freely.
From a footwear construction point of view though, the industrial design challenges for a full, exposed 3D printed silicone outsole is more complex. And running shoes….

[…that we can't talk about right now?]

That is a topic we definitely can't talk about right now *laughs*.

...Dimi, it is your turn, right?
We walk out of the meeting room to a corner of the office
with machinery and screens filled with various charts and 3D models.
..
Dimi Wiertz [ILE, design engineer]:

I don't know what Denis has told you…

[Everything, all the secrets.]

Then, I don't have anything to hide anymore. Let's get scanned!

Here you can see the heel-toe length, and it is interpreted as size 42 for the right foot, while the other foot is almost size 43. Despite this, the scanner suggests size 43-44, this is due to your low feet arches.

The system takes this into consideration as extreme low arches (flat feet) require often slightly larger shoe sizes for comfort.

By the way, your left foot has an even lower arch than the right foot.

[Is it showing exactly in millimeters?]

Yes, but these parameters are used exclusively by the Ai behind the customization engine. We just show the suggested foot size for information, we can now do it now with a mobile app as well.
Dimi Wiertz [ILE, design engineer]:

I don't know what Denis has told you…

[Everything, all the secrets.]

Then, I don't have anything to hide anymore. Let's get scanned!

Here you can see the heel-toe length, and it is interpreted as size 42 for the right foot, while the other foot is almost size 43. Despite this, the scanner suggests size 43-44, this is due to your low feet arches.
The system takes this into consideration as extreme low arches (flat feet) require often slightly larger shoe sizes for comfort.

By the way, your left foot has an even lower arch than the right foot.

[Is it showing exactly in millimeters?]

Yes, but these parameters are used exclusively by the Ai behind the customization engine. We just show the suggested foot size for information, we can now do it now with a mobile app as well.
[Just with a phone camera?]

Yes, with a standard smartphone. The app guides you through several captures of your feet, generating a very accurate 3D model, like a fixed foot scanner. The app is not for public use but just used for research. So, this is the first step, an anatomical scan. Now we pick up a shoe for you, size 43 as suggested. This shoe is equipped with a sensor, here you can take a look at it… it sits inside the midsole, right under the heel.


I'm going to get you walking on this treadmill, please keep your weight forward as we don't want you to fall and hurt yourself. Sensors are now both connected, you can see the live feed on the screen, I'll bring the speed up to 5 km/h, I think you can handle that. This speed is ideal, a bit brisk but it is the sweet spot for our measurements as it is fast enough to reduce any self-awareness of your own steps, something that could alter the gait measurement slightly… Now I am not going to talk for 30 seconds, not because I don't like you, I just don't want to interfere with the experiment… Now you're corrupting the experiment by using your phone by the way…
[Oops, really?]

You will notice that later in the data session, any small distraction during walking on these measurements is altering data to some extent. So, as you have now experienced, 30 seconds are enough for us to snap a biomechanical picture of you. We can show you full playback of your steps as you can see with this 3D representation, your feet moving in a 3D space as we capture both momentum and rotational values of the feet on three axes, additionally, we record load parameters generated by the body weight and motion. This channel, for example, is very important, shows us your stability levels, this other clarify if you are a heel, midfoot, or forefoot striker, and this other show the total amount of energy generated by the step…

In terms of loads, the red graph is always your right foot, and the yellow graph is your left foot. You have a little bit more load on your right foot than on your left foot, this is often detected in many people, but in your case, it is quite evident; it could be caused by the size difference between left and right foot or some other issues we could investigate further.
[Is this data accurate for running?]


It is very accurate in a consumer setting, meaning, we interpret the data as "suggestions" and not as certified biomechanic data. Our data analytics demonstrates that by using customized components inside the shoe, the behavior, and performance of footwear can be tuned. You could envision a future where consumers are at home, fine-tuning their sensor-embedded footwear and seeing near-real-time results on an app to reach maximum efficiency or comfort for different occasions. On a side note, the beauty of this tech is that our customized 3D-printed midsoles are invisible from the outside. The real engine behind Quant-U is inside the shoe and can be adapted to various categories.
I am sure you didn't expect all this technology to come here, right? ECCO is a fairly traditional shoe brand, despite this, the technology and knowledge we have in our company are very advanced and digitally mature.

At ILE we follow a scientific method in a creative playground, not being purely marketing-driven, everything we do is really devoted to true end-user benefits within our brand values and an eye to disruption and new business models.

So, right now your midsole is being printed, right after the scan, in two minutes, 3D printing G Code has been generated in the cloud and sent to one of the available printers.
[Is this data accurate for running?]

It is very accurate in a consumer setting, meaning, we interpret the data as "suggestions" and not as certified biomechanic data. Our data analytics demonstrates that by using customized components inside the shoe, the behavior, and performance of footwear can be tuned. You could envision a future where consumers are at home, fine-tuning their sensor-embedded footwear and seeing near-real-time results on an app to reach maximum efficiency or comfort for different occasions. On a side note, the beauty of this tech is that our customized 3D-printed midsoles are invisible from the outside. The real engine behind Quant-U is inside the shoe and can be adapted to various categories.
I am sure you didn't expect all this technology to come here, right? ECCO is a fairly traditional shoe brand, despite this, the technology and knowledge we have in our company are very advanced and digitally mature.

At ILE we follow a scientific method in a creative playground, not being purely marketing-driven, everything we do is really devoted to true end-user benefits within our brand values and an eye to disruption and new business models.

So, right now your midsole is being printed, right after the scan, in two minutes, 3D printing G Code has been generated in the cloud and sent to one of the available printers.
[How many layers are there?]

This pair of midsoles have 21 layers each, they will be completed in 1,2 hours. The silicone printers we use have so many advantages compared to other 3D printing methods.

The process is non-toxic during printing, this allowed us to place printers at ISPO for example, or in stores in Japan.

The layer size and number depend on the load they are supposed to support and on the dynamic response; prints don't need any post-processing or curing; they are removed from the print bed and could be worn right away.

What we do here in our lab's workshop, is to prototype mainly and measure. We have DLP, SLS, and filament printers, besides the silicone printers, everything is mostly used for design mockups like the concepts you see here in these vitrines.

[We already asked a question about running shoes. Do you have something in the works to measure data for runners, like Stryd?]

Patrizio Carlucci [Head of Innovation Lab]: In theory, our sensors can measure running performance as well as other consumer-grade shoe sensor systems on the market with the advantage of the peculiar sensor placement and embedded load cells.
[How many layers are there?]

This pair of midsoles have 21 layers each, they will be completed in 1,2 hours. The silicone printers we use have so many advantages compared to other 3D printing methods.

The process is non-toxic during printing, this allowed us to place printers at ISPO for example, or in stores in Japan.

The layer size and number depend on the load they are supposed to support and on the dynamic response; prints don't need any post-processing or curing; they are removed from the print bed and could be worn right away.
What we do here in our lab's workshop, is to prototype mainly and measure. We have DLP, SLS, and filament printers, besides the silicone printers, everything is mostly used for design mockups like the concepts you see here in these vitrines.

[We already asked a question about running shoes. Do you have something in the works to measure data for runners, like Stryd?]

Patrizio Carlucci [Head of Innovation Lab]: In theory, our sensors can measure running performance as well as other consumer-grade shoe sensor systems on the market with the advantage of the peculiar sensor placement and embedded load cells.
[Yet Stryd is connected to the laces?]

Exactly. The problem with that is that the upper moves slightly with ankle rotations while our sensors are embedded within the outsole, very close to the ground. There is a moment during the stride when our sensor lay completely flat on the ground acting similarly to a biomechanic plate. This allows us to have a proper maximum load, zero rotation moment that our Ai uses to calibrate all the rest of the measurements, this is done each and every step by the way. And when you see this data here, you can understand its granularity.

This is the power that you exert at take-off and this is energy lost during the foot strike, these are your stability limits, total load, slippage, symmetry, the center of gravity, etc... What matters to us is data accuracy and the capability to detect changes while using a different 3D printed component, different in viscosity or hardness, arch shape, or volume.

[It can be useful for runners, trail runners.]

Absolutely, because the best running shoe, or any shoe to be fair, is the shoe that fits you best.

[Quote it, print it on the wall.]

Thanks for coming over guys, we hope to have given you a more progressive impression of our brand.
[Yet Stryd is connected to the laces?]

Exactly. The problem with that is that the upper moves slightly with ankle rotations while our sensors are within the outsole, very close to the ground. There is a moment during the stride when our sensor lay completely flat on the ground acting similarly to a biomechanic plate. This allows us to have a proper maximum load, zero rotation moment that our Ai uses to calibrate all the rest of the measurements, this is done each and every step by the way. And when you see this data here, you can understand its granularity.

This is the power that you exert at take-off and this is energy lost during the foot strike, these are your stability limits, total load, slippage, symmetry, the center of gravity, etc... What matters to us is data accuracy and the capability to detect changes while using a different 3D printed component, different in viscosity or hardness, arch shape, or volume.

[It can be useful for runners, trail runners.]

Absolutely, because the best running shoe, or any shoe to be true, is the shoe that fits you best.

[Quote it, print it on the wall.]

Thanks for coming over guys, we hope to have given you a more progressive impression of our brand.
Innovation is a bumpy ride.
It requires a lot of passion for one's idea.
To develop this idea into a real tangible thing is even harder.

Having witnessed Quant-U's progression from our very first meeting at ISPO 2019 up to 2022 we can surely say that the team at ILE is a passion powerhouse, and we are so excited to see where they will take it.

Stay tuned for more articles from our European tour soon.
Produced by TECHUNTER Media.

Questions: Alex Zabelin, Ivan Dzhatiev [THM].
Answers: Denis Khrebtov [ILE, Head of Digital], Dimi Wiertz [ILE, design engineer], Patrizio Carlucci [Head of Innovation Lab].
Decryption: Artemii Kozak.
Edit: Ivan Dzhatiev [THM].
Layout: Alex Zabelin [THM].
Images: Ivan Dzhatiev, Alex Zabelin [THM].
Special thanks to FUJIFILM for the gear support during our trip.