Designed In Paris For Running: SATISFY [Studio tour + interview]
For some, running is a way to stay healthy, for some – a competitive sport. For the team of SATISFY– obsession. Everything about it for them is a vehicle to greater self-understanding, innovation, and betterment of oneself.
Their products are not flashy and do not scream "I am getting that podium today". Their T-shirts have holes in them, but that's the point. A mix of subcultures, rock music, and a love for innovation, all thrown into a boiling cauldron in the center of Paris to get one of the most unique brands in the sports industry.

We sat down with Brice Partouche to talk about his possession, material science, playlists, and his favorite running routes.
Designed In Paris For Running:
SATISFY [Studio tour + interview]
For some, running is a way to stay healthy, for some – a competitive sport. For the team of SATISFY– obsession. Everything about it for them is a vehicle to greater self-understanding, innovation, and betterment of oneself.
Their products are not flashy and do not scream "I am getting that podium today". Their T-shirts have holes in them, but that's the point. A mix of subcultures, rock music, and a love for innovation, all thrown into a boiling cauldron in the center of Paris to get one of the most unique brands in the sports industry.

We sat down with Brice Partouche to talk about his possession, material science, playlists, and his favorite running routes.
Brice Partouche, Founder, CEO and Creative Director of SATISFY.
BP: Check-check, works, yeah?
Welcome to Paris, and welcome to SATISFY creative studio.

[TH: We were browsing your interviews, and there is not that much information or questions about the fabrics. Definitely feels like you have a lot to say about the fabrics that you use. And not a lot of articles go past that part. A lot of people talk about the fact that you merge the idea of fashionable running to produce the highest quality pieces that are performance wear. But with the aesthetic, it is nowhere to be seen in the industry at this point. What is your take on how you treat and incorporate the materials?]

Yes. Of course, it starts with the fabric.



I had a precise idea of the brand when I started it – as you mention, the couture behind the brand and the design. But it all started with the fabrics.

I love fabrics. I like going to PV [Premiere Vision], or Performance Days, one of my favorite shows. It is as great as going to a concert. I love the relationships with fabric suppliers. When you are at a point where you are able to develop your own fabrics, it is very thrilling. And yes, we are known for our superlight fabrics. The fact is that most brands use knitted fabrics – for liners, T-shirts, and leggings. But we use woven fabrics, which is quite unique.
BP: Check-check, works, yeah?
Welcome to Paris, and welcome to SATISFY creative studio.

[TH: We were browsing your interviews, and there is not that much information or questions about the fabrics. Definitely feels like you have a lot to say about the fabrics that you use. And not a lot of articles go past that part. A lot of people talk about the fact that you merge the idea of fashionable running to produce the highest quality pieces that are performance wear. But with the aesthetic, it is nowhere to be seen in the industry at this point. What is your take on how you treat and incorporate the materials?]

Yes. Of course, it starts with the fabric.
I had a precise idea of the brand when I started it – as you mention, the couture behind the brand and the design. But it all started with the fabrics.

I love fabrics. I like going to PV [Premiere Vision], or Performance Days, one of my favorite shows. It is as great as going to a concert. I love the relationships with fabric suppliers. When you are at a point where you are able to develop your own fabrics, it is very thrilling. And yes, we are known for our superlight fabrics. The fact is that most brands use knitted fabrics – for liners, T-shirts, and leggings. But we use woven fabrics, which is quite unique.
In the 40s and 50s, France had a lot of silk makers but then silk production moved to Asia. So we were left with a lot of mills that were able to weave very thin fibers, like silk. But when the silk industry moved, they had to transform and pivot their industry into something new. And they found out they could transform their industry into technical fabrics. This is why we work with French fabric suppliers who are former silk makers. These fabrics have an incredible hand feel.

We always say that the purpose of SATISFY is to help people reach the High when they run, to remove any distractions. To accomplish this, how the fabric feels on your skin is of primary importance. Your first interaction with any product is really the feel and the weight, a kind of tactile experience that precedes anything else. Most brands do not really mention that, you know? But the first connection you will have with a product, before even wearing it, is just holding it in your hand.

So for me, it is really important that we build on this hand-feel for all of our products. It was clear to me that we needed something very silky, very soft against the skin and that would not make any noise – because I hate when running gear is noisy in motion.

That is why we group all of these fabrics under "Peace and Silence Technology", because they bring peace to your body and to your skin, and they are not noisy. So before being breathable or water repellent, we remove the distraction and create a system of peace and silence around the product.
In the 40s and 50s, France had a lot of silk makers but then silk production moved to Asia. So we were left with a lot of mills that were able to weave very thin fibers, like silk. But when the silk industry moved, they had to transform and pivot their industry into something new. And they found out they could transform their industry into technical fabrics. This is why we work with French fabric suppliers who are former silk makers. These fabrics have an incredible hand feel.

We always say that the purpose of SATISFY is to help people reach the High when they run, to remove any distractions. To accomplish this, how the fabric feels on your skin is of primary importance. Your first interaction with any product is really the feel and the weight, a kind of tactile experience that precedes anything else. Most brands do not really mention that, you know? But the first connection you will have with a product, before even wearing it, is just holding it in your hand.
So for me, it is really important that we build on this hand-feel for all of our products. It was clear to me that we needed something very silky, very soft against the skin and that would not make any noise – because I hate when running gear is noisy in motion.

That is why we group all of these fabrics under "Peace and Silence Technology", because they bring peace to your body and to your skin, and they are not noisy. So before being breathable or water repellent, we remove the distraction and create a system of peace and silence around the product.
[There is not a lot of presentation around the runner's tactile experience. So, one of the things that SATISFY is known for – is an experience. Rather than traditional running brands focusing on achieving a goal.]

Exactly.

[Where is this fine line in your clothing? Because your products are high performance first. They are obviously really beautiful, but they are super high performance.]

As you said, all the products are high performance, like they are all you need for running. We love the performance, but we have this approach of, I call it, "Romantic Performance" – it is not about achieving the goal, it is about the whole experience. To put it more precisely, it is like skateboarding – there is no score in skateboarding and there is no winner.

We love the idea of running far or for a long time. It is more about how far I will be able to run, not how far in a race, but how far in my life.

I want to be able to run for as long as I can in my life. I want to be 80 and still be able to run. Of course, the products have to be super high-performing — you can sprint or break records with our products, no problem. It is just that we do not promote this idea of getting fast, we promote the idea of "getting high" on your run.
[There is not a lot of presentation around the runner's tactile experience. So, one of the things that SATISFY is known for – is an experience. Rather than traditional running brands focusing on achieving a goal.]

Exactly.

[Where is this fine line in your clothing? Because your products are high performance first. They are obviously really beautiful, but they are super high performance.]
As you said, all the products are high performance, like they are all you need for running. We love the performance, but we have this approach of, I call it, "Romantic Performance" – it is not about achieving the goal, it is about the whole experience. To put it more precisely, it is like skateboarding – there is no score in skateboarding and there is no winner.

We love the idea of running far or for a long time. It is more about how far I will be able to run, not how far in a race, but how far in my life.

I want to be able to run for as long as I can in my life. I want to be 80 and still be able to run. Of course, the products have to be super high-performing — you can sprint or break records with our products, no problem. It is just that we do not promote this idea of getting fast, we promote the idea of "getting high" on your run.
[Speaking more about the fabrics? How do you develop them?]

We source or develop our fabrics. Most of the fabrics are from France, Switzerland, Italy, and Japan. We are known for our proprietary fabric called Justice™. It is a fabric that we developed in France. It is one of the lightest fabrics in the world, and it's woven. We use this fabric for all of the liners in our shorts. It has a four-way, multidimensional stretch. We don't add any coating or treatments. I like when the fabrics are naturally technical. We also use it for tights, like compression or half tights. We also use it for T-shirts and singlets and have even managed to create a three-layer jacket with this fabric. We also have a version, which is woven with merino wool. Again, I like when fabrics are naturally technical and when you do not need to add DWR coating or anti-odor treatment to enhance.

The fact that we use super light fabrics that are four-way stretch and woven also makes them naturally anti-odorant. More sweat will pass through the fabric and it will dry faster. The odor usually develops because the fabric won't dry fast enough. The point of adding anti-odor chemicals does not make sense to me.
If you use smart fabric, like naturally smart, you don't need coating and additives like this.

We also like to use fabrics that are not expected in the running/activewear world, like cotton. I'm a big advocate of running in cotton.

[Why though?]

Because when I started to run, my go-to running top was just a cotton T-shirt. When you just start out, you don't buy top-of-the-line products for running. And for me, it was completely fine. I can do like 30K in cotton and it is totally fine. There is no chafing or rubbing.

But the thing is, with our cotton we introduced this technical element, we "hacked" it. We incorporated "moth" holes and this fabric has developed a cult following. We call it MothTech™. The idea is to have holes all over the T-shirts in the places where your body needs extra ventilation. This idea actually came from me just wearing super distressed t-shirts.

Now it is laser-cut. *laughs*
[It is a precise pattern that you guys researched, or it is more of a feeling?]

Yes, we did some research internally. It depends on the body anyway, but we made this pattern that we thought would make sense. And we have been using this pattern for five years now. We actually receive a lot of user comments – people love to run in our cotton. I know, cotton is not as technical as polyester or polyamide. But it is something which is very funny: people like to see their sweat. It is actually kind of satisfying to see.

[Proves you are actually doing something.]

Yeah.

[Are there any other natural materials that you guys use that you enjoy personally?]

Yes. Our merino wool. We use a type of Optimo Merino that is the thinnest and the finest merino wool you can find in the world. It's knitted by a factory in Japan.
And since the factory is in Japan, we are producing the final product in Japan as well. Merino wool is unparalleled in its thermoregulating ability. And again, our merino wool has a uniquely silky hand-feel, so it is not itchy at all and is very soft on your skin. We call it CloudMerino™. The products we make from CloudMerino™ all have raw hems.

We also like to avoid superficial add-ons on products. If we can do raw hems, we do it, because this is the most simple thing.

[Why do you even seam there at this point…]

Exactly, you just add distraction, add thickness, and rub. Also, this fabric or these products are hand-dyed in Japan following the Shibori method, a super authentic Japanese hand tie-dye style.

[So Visvim and you guys are pretty much close then, right?]

It is not something I have ever actually seen in the outdoors industry. When we can bring some cultural elements – not fashion, because tie-dye is more of a cultural element – we try to bring those as much as we can.
[There is an inherent difference between you and what other sportswear brands are doing. Sportswear sells you the idea of a clean start for a run. All the apparel for running is usually super clean.]

Like made in a robot kind of style.

[Yeah, super scientifically advanced. And I don't really compare this to jeans, but I know you did some denim work in the early 2000s. You guys are like distressed jeans from the shop, you give the idea that this is a thing that has been running on for a while. Your clothing represents this heritage running, rather than – "Here, take this high-performance kit and go".]

Yes, because running is a culture and no one is talking about it. In the '70s, when running started as an organized activity, people were wearing military stuff, like shorts, like cotton.
We had this culture. But along the way, it was lost.

SATISFY CELEBRATES THE CULTURE OF RUNNING THROUGH AUTHENTIC AND GENUINE PRODUCTS.

But as you said, brands are selling us this idea that the product is super clean, technical, and made of polyester. They are selling you this idea that you are going to maybe run faster.

First of all, it is how you feel when you wear it, not just physically, but also mentally. So the idea of supporting this culture, for me, wearing a tie-dye makes me feel good.

And if you feel good – you perform better.
And if you look good, you perform better. I think.
[There is an inherent difference between you and what other sportswear brands are doing. Sportswear sells you the idea of a clean start for a run. All the apparel for running is usually super clean.]

Like made in a robot kind of style.

[Yeah, super scientifically advanced. And I don't really compare this to jeans, but I know you did some denim work in the early 2000s. You guys are like distressed jeans from the shop, you give the idea that this is a thing that has been running on for a while. Your clothing represents this heritage running, rather than – "Here, take this high-performance kit and go".]

Yes, because running is a culture and no one is talking about it. In the '70s, when running started as an organized activity, people were wearing military stuff, like shorts, like cotton. We had this culture. But along the way, it was lost.




SATISFY CELEBRATES THE CULTURE OF RUNNING THROUGH AUTHENTIC AND GENUINE PRODUCTS.



But as you said, brands are selling us this idea that the product is super clean, technical, and made of polyester. They are selling you this idea that you are going to maybe run faster.

First of all, it is how you feel when you wear it, not just physically, but also mentally. So the idea of supporting this culture, for me, wearing a tie-dye makes me feel good. And if you feel good – you perform better. And if you look good, you perform better. I think.
[Jumping off this idea, what is your personal preference? Where do you position your brand and yourself personally as a runner?]

We definitely feel close to the trail running community. We have always been shooting in the great outdoors, we have been romanticizing this idea of trail running. We are trying to change the game of trail running, especially in Europe. You have this pre-established trail runner look, with gear that is made of synthetic fabrics and spandex. So yeah, we are trying to shake things up and create a new vibe and look for trail running.

That is why we are working with Michael Versteeg, our first pro athlete who is a true trail runner. He is helping us develop products.

[So we can see your guy at UTMB this year, right?]

Maybe not this year…

[We were at the UTMB and we saw guys running in Satisfy. Not saying they are in the top ten that get paid, but the guys who run for themselves run in Satisfy.]

Yeah. I don't know, I do not feel personally close to UTMB, but I feel personally close to Michael Versteeg running 250 miles for himself.

I love racing, I really respect it.
[Jumping off this idea, what is your personal preference? Where do you position your brand and yourself personally as a runner?]

We definitely feel close to the trail running community. We have always been shooting in the great outdoors, we have been romanticizing this idea of trail running. We are trying to change the game of trail running, especially in Europe. You have this pre-established trail runner look, with gear that is made of synthetic fabrics and spandex. So yeah, we are trying to shake things up and create a new vibe and look for trail running.

That is why we are working with Michael Versteeg, our first pro athlete who is a true trail runner. He is helping us develop products.

[So we can see your guy at UTMB this year, right?]

Maybe not this year…
[We were at the UTMB and we saw guys running in Satisfy. Not saying they are in the top ten that get paid, but the guys who run for themselves run in Satisfy.]

Yeah. I don't know, I do not feel personally close to UTMB, but I feel personally close to Michael Versteeg running 250 miles for himself.

I love racing, I really respect it.

It is just when we started working with Michael Versteeg, the first race he did – he won it. He ran like a 250 miler. And that is great. But if he would have come last, it would be the same. The experience.

What I love about trail running is that you go through a lot of experiences throughout the run. It's really not about winning at all. Winning matters for maybe 0.00001% of people who do marathons. No one will be like, "Oh, I'm going to win the marathon." I think people do not want to win races, they want to experience the race.
It is just when we started working with Michael Versteeg, the first race he did – he won it. He ran like a 250 miler. And that is great. But if he would have come last, it would be the same. The experience.

What I love about trail running is that you go through a lot of experiences throughout the run. It's really not about winning at all. Winning matters for maybe 0.00001% of people who do marathons. No one will be like, "Oh, I'm going to win the marathon." I think people do not want to win races, they want to experience the race.

We have never been about city runs. Personally, I live in Paris, and most of my runs are in the city. But when I can go run in the forest, I do it. Paris actually is a good place for running. I mean, you can find some uphill places, we have a route that we like, it is called Paris-Versailles. You start in Paris, you end in Versaille, it is a lot of uphills, and you go through Forêt de Meudon, it is really nice.

[What is the running culture here? We see more runners in Paris in comparison to other cities.]

A lot of people, especially during the pandemic, have started to run. Paris is a big running city, but also the city is more bike and runner-friendly now. A lot of roads have been blocked off from cars. And it is easier now to be a runner in Paris. It is actually nice, on a day like this. Our office is very close to Canal Saint-Martin. When you train, and you have to do 30K, you have this longer route with no cars. You can run up to – or down to – Reims, which is like 150 kilometers away from here.
We have never been about city runs. Personally, I live in Paris, and most of my runs are in the city. But when I can go run in the forest, I do it. Paris actually is a good place for running. I mean, you can find some uphill places, we have a route that we like, it is called Paris-Versailles. You start in Paris, you end in Versaille, it is a lot of uphills, and you go through Forêt de Meudon, it is really nice.
[What is the running culture here? We see more runners in Paris in comparison to other cities.]

A lot of people, especially during the pandemic, have started to run. Paris is a big running city, but also the city is more bike and runner-friendly now. A lot of roads have been blocked off from cars. And it is easier now to be a runner in Paris. It is actually nice, on a day like this. Our office is very close to Canal Saint-Martin. When you train, and you have to do 30K, you have this longer route with no cars. You can run up to – or down to – Reims, which is like 150 kilometers away from here.
[Let's talk about the audience map, what is the market for Satisfy?]

Satisfy today is 80% direct-to-consumer, so we do mostly online business. 50% of our community is based in the US. The rest is mostly Scandinavian, especially Sweden, and then Norway, Germany, and the UK. And a bit in Asia, we are starting to grow there.
[Did you ever want to add some label fabrics, maybe because of their proven technologies? What is your stance on that? Because a lot of brands go towards established titles at this point. And rarely do people have both opportunity and interest in developing their own stuff.]

We do both, actually, but I think what matters is the final product. So, for example, we work with Polartec®. The way we use Polartec®, we do not call our products Polartec®, we call them GhostFleece™ because they are super light, like a ghost. GhostFleece™ is actually a combination of the Polartec® technology with our signature fit that gives more movement and enhances thermo-regulation. Also, we have just developed a new fabric. It is a ripstop fabric that we call PowerFlower™ because it is nylon that has been made from plants.
[It would be interesting to compare. A lot of development has been going into incorporating natural ingredients. The idea behind this is its first performance or eco-friendliness?]

To me, it starts with a function. Sustainability and being eco are something that every brand should include. A mandatory thing. And again, I really believe that if the brand is only eco-friendly, and the product is not great for performance or design, people will not care.

WE SHOULD NOT EVEN MENTION THAT PRODUCTS ARE ECO-FRIENDLY, IT SHOULD BE A GIVEN.

We produce locally: when we use fabrics from Europe, we produce in Portugal, when we use fabrics from Japan, we produce in Japan. But also our business model is very sustainable because we do not do collections, we do not overproduce. We do not put our products on sale, for example. We do not have this overstock, we do not produce for the sake of producing more and more. Everything is super under control, which is also a big part of a sustainable approach.
Sustainability is not only about the fabric and the green label, it is also about how you handle your production, and what you produce.

I think, if you sell a pair of shorts for $40, there is a problem. You can be sustainable, but there is a problem. Our fabric goes between 15-20 Euros per meter, so how is it possible to produce a shirt for 30 dollars?

We are actually pushing more and more so that we can replace our synthetic fibers with recycled fibers, as we have done for our AuraLite™ fabric. It used to be 100% Polyester, now it is 100% recycled polyester.

We also have this upcycle program that we call Re-Possessed™. It is a program that starts with vintage pieces. For inspiration in our work, we buy a lot of vintage T-shirts and stuff. We upcycle them afterward, transform them and sell 1 of 1.

And we are also thinking of doing a repair and upcycling program, where people can send back their products when they are all beaten up. And we will not replace them, but fix and repair them.

It is a project that we are working on right now.
[It would be interesting to compare. A lot of development has been going into incorporating natural ingredients. The idea behind this is its first performance or eco-friendliness?]

To me, it starts with a function. Sustainability and being eco are something that every brand should include. A mandatory thing. And again, I really believe that if the brand is only eco-friendly, and the product is not great for performance or design, people will not care.




WE SHOULD NOT EVEN MENTION THAT PRODUCTS ARE ECO-FRIENDLY, IT SHOULD BE A GIVEN.




We produce locally: when we use fabrics from Europe, we produce in Portugal, when we use fabrics from Japan, we produce in Japan. But also our business model is very sustainable because we do not do collections, we do not overproduce. We do not put our products on sale, for example. We do not have this overstock, we do not produce for the sake of producing more and more. Everything is super under control, which is also a big part of a sustainable approach.
Sustainability is not only about the fabric and the green label, it is also about how you handle your production, and what you produce. I think, if you sell a pair of shorts for $40, there is a problem. You can be sustainable, but there is a problem. Our fabric goes between 15-20 Euros per meter, so how is it possible to produce a shirt for 30 dollars?

We are actually pushing more and more so that we can replace our synthetic fibers with recycled fibers, as we have done for our AuraLite™ fabric. It used to be 100% Polyester, now it is 100% recycled polyester.

We also have this upcycle program that we call Re-Possessed™. It is a program that starts with vintage pieces. For inspiration in our work, we buy a lot of vintage T-shirts and stuff. We upcycle them afterward, transform them and sell 1 of 1.

And we are also thinking of doing a repair and upcycling program, where people can send back their products when they are all beaten up. And we will not replace them, but fix and repair them.

It is a project that we are working on right now.
[We also wanted to ask about your Possessed magazine. What is the idea behind that, and how it was created?]

I think as a brand we want to have a tone, and having a magazine is a perfect way to do it. Brands do not have a tone, people have a tone. So, behind the magazine, we have Adam, our Head of Culture, also Editor-in-Chief of Possessed Magazine. Having his voice, his tone – it is quite amazing.

We launched Possessed magazine more than a year ago. And it has been super interesting. Maybe we will do a print version at some point but so far it is just digital. And it is great because it gives us a platform, where we are allowed to pick out everything. It is a platform where people can interact with us as well. We have this "show" on Instagram we call "Ask Us Shit", where we invite the community to ask us whatever they want—it could be running-related or not—and we will try to answer their questions.
But it also provides a space where people can talk freely about anything: running, music, psychedelics, love, food, whatever.

It is a magazine for the community.


AND RUNNERS ARE NOT ONLY RUNNERS,
THEY ARE PEOPLE.



[That is usually lost on sportswear brands. You do not do sports 99.99% of your time. People mostly do not do sports just for a living.]

And this was the starting point of Possessed, like runners are not only runners.
[We also wanted to ask about your Possessed magazine. What is the idea behind that, and how it was created?]

I think as a brand we want to have a tone, and having a magazine is a perfect way to do it. Brands do not have a tone, people have a tone. So, behind the magazine, we have Adam, our Head of Culture, also Editor-in-Chief of Possessed Magazine. Having his voice, his tone – it is quite amazing.

We launched Possessed magazine more than a year ago. And it has been super interesting. Maybe we will do a print version at some point but so far it is just digital. And it is great because it gives us a platform, where we are allowed to pick out everything. It is a platform where people can interact with us as well. We have this "show" on Instagram we call "Ask Us Shit", where we invite the community to ask us whatever they want—it could be running-related or not—and we will try to answer their questions.
But it also provides a space where people can talk freely about anything: running, music, psychedelics, love, food, whatever.

It is a magazine for the community.




AND RUNNERS ARE NOT ONLY RUNNERS,
THEY ARE PEOPLE.





[That is usually lost on sportswear brands. You do not do sports 99.99% of your time. People mostly do not do sports just for a living.]

And this was the starting point of Possessed, like runners are not only runners.
[Another question that we have, about the other side of the running brand – shoes. What shoes are you wearing right now? Is there any particular model that you enjoy running in more than others? And do you have any plans for the next shoe collaboration? We know your stance is that you do not want to do it just for the sake of doing it.]

Personally, I love my Norda. I use them for both trail and road running.

I also switch between Hoka and Asics. Hoka – I love the Clifton. It is a classic. And Asics – I have MetaRide, which I really like.

We did a collaboration with Salomon three years ago. We are working on a shoe collaboration for 2022, and other collaborative projects for 2023.

[Is this officially good to post?]

In 2023 we are going to make a few great collaborations that I am super excited about.

It is another type of knowledge when you make a shoe. It is something we are looking at, not exploring yet.

It is really exciting because today running shoe technology is pretty much open source and easily accessible.
[Another question that we have, about the other side of the running brand – shoes. What shoes are you wearing right now? Is there any particular model that you enjoy running in more than others? And do you have any plans for the next shoe collaboration? We know your stance is that you do not want to do it just for the sake of doing it.]

Personally, I love my Norda. I use them for both trail and road running.

I also switch between Hoka and Asics. Hoka – I love the Clifton. It is a classic. And Asics – I have MetaRide, which I really like.

We did a collaboration with Salomon three years ago. We are working on a shoe collaboration for 2022, and other collaborative projects for 2023.
[Is this officially good to post?]

In 2023 we are going to make a few great collaborations that I am super excited about.

It is another type of knowledge when you make a shoe. It is something we are looking at, not exploring yet.

It is really exciting because today running shoe technology is pretty much open source and easily accessible.
[The market is exploding, smaller brands are popping up, especially the trail running market. The creativity of people is finally met by the ability of the market to make dreams come alive, and you don't have to be a giant brand with a million euro budget to do it.]

Exactly. But then again, it depends. We got technology and performance on the market, it is great. It is more like: do I want to support one of these big brands as a consumer? Or do I want the niche? Coming from where I come from, you tend to support the niche brand, and made by the people you like, cool people. And not like the huge corporate brands that overproduce at low cost, filling the mass market. All these brands do some great products, it works, of course.

But the question is, who do I want to support? And I miss local small brands, like Norda. Because it is an independent brand, they are like us.

We would like to see more niche brands.

[Do you experience other running brands in your everyday runs, or do you just use Satisfy?]

I have to say, I only wear Satisfy when I run. And also I mostly wear prototypes and don't really get the stuff from our stock. Sometimes I wear band t-shirts.
[The market is exploding, smaller brands are popping up, especially the trail running market. The creativity of people is finally met by the ability of the market to make dreams come alive, and you don't have to be a giant brand with a million euro budget to do it.]

Exactly. But then again, it depends.

We got technology and performance on the market, it is great. It is more like: do I want to support one of these big brands as a consumer? Or do I want the niche? Coming from where I come from, you tend to support the niche brand, and made by the people you like, cool people. And not like the huge corporate brands that overproduce at low cost, filling the mass market. All these brands do some great products, it works, of course.

But the question is, who do I want to support? And I miss local small brands, like Norda. Because it is an independent brand, they are like us.

We would like to see more niche brands.
[Do you experience other running brands in your everyday runs, or do you just use Satisfy?]

I have to say, I only wear Satisfy when I run. And also I mostly wear prototypes and don't really get the stuff from our stock. Sometimes I wear band t-shirts.
[What is your favorite band, in terms of the number of T-shirts that you have?]

I have a lot of band T-shirts. I have too many, actually! I can't say, but they're mostly heavy metal band T-shirts. I am obsessed with long sleeve tees. I've been listening to heavy metal since I was 11, so I have been to a lot of concerts.

I like to compare the Satisfy online store to a merch table. It is like buying a souvenir from an experience, the experience of running.
[Do you have any bands supporting Satisfy?
Heavy metal?]


There is this band called Zig Zags, a punk heavy metal band from California. They ran this Mt. Baldy Run-to-the-Top trail. It is a 10K race, super difficult. Or Walter Schreifels (Youth of Today, Gorilla Biscuits, Quicksand) who recently ran the Brooklyn Marathon and loves Satisfy. We also did a collaboration with Sonic Youth, which was fun too. Music is a big part of my life, so there is definitely a connection between Satisfy and music.
[Do you feel the same energy between rock music and running, in some way?]

Yeah, I mean, of course, rock music or hip hop – it is a passion, it is art, it is culture. I grew up playing drums and I played in a few bands. And this feeling, when you go on stage and you play, that excitement, you know?

[Do you listen to music when you run?]

Sometimes, yes I do. And I feel that at times I just want to hear my breath. It really depends. Mostly yes, but if I have to train I will focus on my breathing.
[What's the most played band in your playlist nowadays?]

Ah yes, it is very bad actually. *laughs*
No, it is not bad, I really love it.

For some reason, I really like to listen to blink-182 when I run. When I do a 10K, I like to listen to Enema of the State, it is super easy, like a no-brainer.

But when I go a longer distance, I like to listen to more complex music.
When I have to run 10K, and I want to run at 5 minutes per K, I just put on Powerslave by Iron Maiden, and I know it is exactly 50 minutes.
[To finish this part, can you recommend the three best places for you to run in the world?]

I don't know if they are the best places, but for me, there are a few runs that I really remember and I enjoyed. I love to go to California, I love to run in Los Angeles. There is one run I like, it is a bit overused, but when you do it early in the morning it is great. The Venice beach run is cool. You start from the pier, and you go to Santa Monica, Pacific Palisade, and you go back and forth, it is about 20K. And when there is no one, at about sunrise, it is just amazing.

My parents are from Grenoble, I grew up in Grenoble in the Alps, so it is very hilly, and I really like to run around there, especially in winter, when there is a bit of snow.
I like the Paris-Versailles, you start from home, and go up to Versailles, it is like 28K.

I love Sweden, I love Stockholm. I've run a lot in Stockholm. Tommy (Satisfy Head of PR) lives in the south, his parents are from the south of France. He invited me once, and we went to Cap Ferrat. And it is amazing, one of the most beautiful runs I've done. It is just by the sea.

Nature is super important.

I like it whether it is super cold or super hot. I like those runs because you can experience them, and try out your gear. It is very simple – you have to ask two questions: how far am I going to run, and what is the temperature. And with Satisfy I try to cover all types of runs. I love it.
Next, we got a tour of the items on deck,
asking Brice to show us unique prototypes
and explain his feeling towards them.
Next, we got a tour of the items on deck, asking Brice to show us unique prototypes and explain his feeling towards them.
HYDRATION VEST:
We developed them for Michael Versteeg when he was running the Colorado Trail.

So, all developed here, this is our fabric. A special version of our woven fabric. And this is weaved with Cordura, it is super light and silky.

These are prototypes that were developed and made here at the office. This one you can wear for a day, or a couple of hours, like one liter of water plus stuff. But this one is super interesting, it has like 25L of cargo capacity. With this one, you can go for a long, multi-day effort. Mike used this on his Colorado Trail FKT attempt.
SILVERSHELL™ PACKABLE WINDBREAKER:
This is our Silvershell™ fabric, it is from Switzerland.

It is a ripstop fabric that has aluminum in the weave and coating. It is perfect for winter when it is very cold. Keeps your body warm and insulated almost. It's packable.

Inspired by the Mylar blanket. And foil also was an inspiration. I love this, one of the first jackets we made.
JUSTICE™ 3-LAYER RUNNING JACKET:
This is like our main hard-shell jacket.

We developed this one with our Justice™ fabric. It has a 3-layer membrane, and here is like a thin mesh. The membrane is purple, and the mesh is grey. And that is why it gives off these iridescent vibes. We developed this in Italy together with the team from Majotech. It has built-in gloves.

This one is for colder seasons.
RECYCLED GHOSTFLEECE™ LONG SLEEVE:
This is made from the Polartec® that I was mentioning earlier.

Super light fabric, constructed with a kind of mock neck, but boxy and slightly oversized to allow increased airflow. Also, there are two pieces of ripstop nylon on the arms.

I like these because when you are doing a trail run and have branches scratching against you and stuff it just adds that extra layer of protection. This is my go-to item. You can wear this against the skin. I like the drop shoulders.
CLOUDMERINO™ T‑SHIRT:
This is merino wool from Japan.

So it is super silky and of course naturally performant.

You can see the detail of the stitching. It adds a bit of extra stretchability.
COFFEETHERMAL™ 8" SHORTS:
This shell is the Rippy™ nylon that I mentioned earlier. Ripstop has texture, it is not flat. The fabric of the liners is interesting. It is made from coffee charcoal. This is the natural color of how it is produced, which results in a grayish color. We call it CoffeeThermal™. And it actually warms your body. It is a fabric from France.

The main pocketing systems of our shorts are basically constructed the same way. We have a back pocket inside the liner here to put your phone with a sweat-proof membrane. We made a double waistband because when you tie the short strings, you don't want them to chafe against your belly. You can also tuck in keys or jewelry.
HALF-ZIP SWEATSHIRT:
This is a prototype that hasn't been released yet.
This item is from our Post-Run category.
You need to be inspired to run a marathon. You need to be even more determined to run an ultra. To start running and never stop – you need to be possessed.

Running clothing is just means to achieve something that you are determined to do. Great clothing helps you, and does not get in the way. SATISFY managed to create a unique balance between form and function: utilitarian in its concept, not disturbing you off the path in front, yet remaining extra good looking, while doing so.

And we are all for it!
Produced by TECHUNTER Media.

Questions: Alex Zabelin, Ivan Dzhatiev [THM].
Answers: Brice Partouche [SATISFY, founder, CEO, creative director].
Decryption: Artemii Kozak.
Edit: Ivan Dzhatiev [THM].
Layout: Alex Zabelin [THM].
Images: Ivan Dzhatiev, Alex Zabelin [THM].
Special thanks to FUJIFILM for the gear support during our trip.

Stay tuned for more articles from our European tour soon.